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If You Get Drunk Quickly it May Be in Your Genes

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A recent study points to genetics as a potential reason that some people seem to be more affected by alcohol than others. Kirk Wilhelmsen, senior author of a paper in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, thinks that their findings could potentially change what we think we know about alcohol and how it affects the brain.

According to Wilhelmsen, approximately 10-20% of the population carries a version of a gene that makes their genes sensitive to alcohol. The gene, a version of the CYP2E1 gene, is thought to carry a blueprint of an enzyme known to be involved in metabolizing ethanol alcohol.  Researchers hypothesize that people who carry this version of the gene produce more of the enzyme, which would result in increased sensitivity to alcohol.

The finding doesn’t yet have any treatment application and it’s also important to note that the brain is not the only part of the body involved in alcohol metabolism the liver plays a big part, too.

Dr. Jeffrey Huttman, Chief Clinical Officer of Challenges Addiction and Relapse Prevention Treatment Center  in Ft. Lauderdale, FL, says “It’s unknown how this finding might impact the treatment of alcoholism, but it’s certainly something we’re paying close attention to. At Challenges, regular use of neurofeedback and other methodology specifically targeting the study of the brain and how it reacts to alcohol and other substances is a strong area of focus.  Our treatment for addiction almost always starts with looking at the brain. This is not only often one of the keys to successful treatment, but also prevention of relapse following treatment.”

Also related to a genetic predisposition when it comes to alcohol consumption is a recent study done by Psychological Science. Researchers found that people with a specific genetic profile are often more likely to drink more when they see someone else drinking heavily.

When it comes to alcohol and addiction genetics might well play a big part.

Contact Information:

If you are a member of the media interested in interviewing one of the doctors or experts on the Challenges staff, please contact Michelle Lamar or Shelly Kramer at V3 Integrated Marketing . Contact us at info@v3im.com or call 816-200-2520.

If you are not a member of the media and you are interested in learning more about Challenges addiction recovery program, please contact us by phone at 888-755-3334 or online at http://www.challenges-program.com.

The team at Challenges Addiction and Relapse Prevention Treatment Center is available to help 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Challenges Addiction and Relapse Prevention Treatment Center

5100 Coconut Creek Parkway

Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33063

(888) 755-3334 Toll Free

Challenges Addiction and Relapse Prevention Treatment Center

4440 PGA Blvd., Ste. 600

Palm Beach, Florida 33410

(888) 223-2060 Toll Free

Challenges Addiction and Relapse Prevention Treatment Center

701 Brickel Avenue, Suite 1550

Miami, FL  33131

(877) 477-6479 Toll Free

V3 is a full service marketing agency that specializes in digital media. If you are a member of the media interested in interviewing one of the doctors or experts on the Challenges Addiction and Relapse Prevention Treatment Center staff, please contact Michelle Lamar or Shelly Kramer at V3 Integrated Marketing. Contact us at info@v3im.com or call 816-200-2520.